Efficiency ratings for wire rope end terminations are based upon the catalog breaking strength of wire rope.The efficiency rating of a properly prepared loop or thimble-eye termination for clip sizes 1/8˝ through 7/8˝ is 80%, and for sizes 1˝ through 3-1/2˝ is 90%.
The number of clips shown is based upon using RRL or RLL wire rope, 6 x 19 or 6 x 37 Class, FC or IWRC; IPS or XIP. If Seale construction or similar large outer wire type construction in the 6 x 19 Class is to be used for sizes 1˝ and larger, add one additional clip. If a pulley (sheave) is used for turning back the wire rope, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown also applies to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 8 x 19 Class, IPS, XIP, sizes 1-1/2˝ and smaller; and to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 19 x 7 Class, IPS, XIP, sizes 1-3/4 inch and smaller.
For other classes of wire rope not mentioned above, we recommend contacting Crosby Engineering at the address or telephone number on the back cover to ensure the desired efficiency rating.
For elevator, personnel hoist, and scaffold applications, refer to ANSI A17.1 and ANSI A10.4. These standards do not recommend U-Bolt style wire rope clip terminations. The style wire rope termination used for any application is the obligation of the user.

5. WIRE ROPE SPLICING PROCEDURES:
The preferred method of splicing two wire ropes together is to use interlocking turnback eyes with thimbles, using the recommended number of clips on each eye.
An alternate method is to use twice the number of clips as used for a turnback termination. The rope ends are placed parallel to each other, overlapping by twice the turnback amount shown in the application instructions. The minimum number of clips should be installed on each dead end. Spacing, installation torque, and other instructions still apply.
6. IMPORTANT
Apply first load to test the assembly. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use. Next, check and retighten nuts to recommended torque. In accordance with good rigging and maintenance practices, the wire rope end termination should be inspected periodically for wear, abuse, and general adequacy.
WIRE ROPE TERMINATIONS
Warnings and Application Instructions For U-Bolt Clips
WARNING
• Failure to read, understand, and follow these instructions may cause death or serious injury.
• Read and understand these instructions before using clips.
• Match the same size clip to the same size wire rope.
• Prepare wire rope end termination only as instructed.
• Do not use with plastic coated wire rope.
• Apply first load to test the assembly. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads
expected in use. Next, check and retighten nuts to recommended torque

CERTEX provides the rope slings, rope terminations and other tailor-made assemblies that allow our customers to tackle their lifting challenges with confidence. At CERTEX, every custom operation from cutting rope to applying hooks and shackles to making the most demanding sling, carries out the same assurance of safety.
Safety is built into our products at every stage of our fabricating process. A CERTEX-made product can be trusted because it starts with components that meet the highest possible standards of safety and reliability. Using these quality components, the CERTEX expertise in lifting is applied in our own rigging shops: the result is customized lifting equipment that will performin the most critical applications where lives and property depend on it.
With experienced people and machinery to produce the lifting equipment that our customers specify, CERTEX companies everywhere are committed to the complete reliability of every product that we make. Putting Certainty Into Everything We Make.

Lifting Products and Services
Efficiency ratings for wire rope end terminations are based upon the catalog breaking strength of wire rope. The efficiency rating of a properly prepared loop or thimble-eye termination for clip sizes 1/8˝ through 7/8˝ is 80%, and for sizes 1˝ through 3-1/2˝ is 90%.
The number of clips shown (see Table 1) is based upon using RRL or RLL wire rope, 6 x 19 or 6 x 37 Class, FC or IWRC; IPS or XIP. If Seale construction or similar large outer wire type construction in the 6 x 19 Class is to be used for sizes 1˝ and larger, add one additional clip. If a pulley (sheave) is used for turning back the wire rope, add one additional clip.
The number of clips shown also applies to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 8 x 19 Class, IPS, XIP, sizes 1-1/2˝ and smaller; and to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 19 x 7 Class, IPS, XIP, sizes 1-1/2˝ and smaller.
For other classes of wire rope not mentioned above, we recommend contacting Crosby Engineering at the address or telephone number on the back cover to ensure the desired efficiency rating. The style of wire rope termination used for any application is the obligation of the user.
For OSHA (Construction) applications, see OSHA
1926.251.
1. Turn back specified amount of rope from thimble or loop. Apply first clip one base width from dead end of rope. Tighten nuts evenly, alternating from one nut to the other until reaching the recommended torque.
2. When two clips are required, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible. Tighten nuts evenly, alternating until reaching the recommended torque. When more than two clips are required, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible, turn nuts on second clip firmly, but do not tighten. Proceed to Step 3.
3. When three or more clips are required, space additional clips equally between first two—take up rope slack—tighten nuts on all clips, alternating from one nut to the other until reaching recommended torque.
4. If a pulley (sheave) is used, in place of a thimble add one additional Fist Grip.
5. WIRE ROPE SPLICING PROCEDURES:
The preferred method of splicing two wire ropes together is to use interlocking turnback eyes with thimbles, using the recommended number of clips on each eye
An alternate method is to use twice the number of clips as used for a turnback termination. The rope ends are placed parallel to each other, overlapping by twice the turnback amount shown in the application instructions. The minimum number of clips should be installed on each dead end. Spacing, installation torque, and other instructions still apply.
6. IMPORTANT
Apply first load to test the assembly. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use. Next, check and retighten nuts to recommended torque. In accordance with good rigging and maintenance practices, the wire rope end termination should be inspected periodically for wear, abuse, and general adequacy.

WIRE ROPE TERMINATIONS
Warnings and Application Instructions For Fistgrip Clips
WARNING
• Failure to read, understand, and follow these instructions may cause death or serious injury.
• Read and understand these instructions before using clips.
• Match the same size clip to the same size wire rope.
• Prepare wire rope end termination only as instructed.
• Do not use with plastic coated wire rope.
• Apply first load to test the assembly.This load should be of equalor greater weight than loads expected in use. Next, check andretighten nuts to recommended torque.
Important Safety Information —
Read and Follow
Inspection/Maintenance Safety
• Always inspect socket,wedge and pin before using.
• Do not use part showing cracks.
• Do not use modified or substitute parts.
• Repair minor nicks or gouges to socket or pin by lightly grinding until surfaces are smooth. Do not reduce original dimension more than 10%. Do not repair by welding.
• Inspect permanent assemblies annually, or more often in severe operating conditions.
Assembly Safety
• Use only with standard 6 to 8 strand wire rope of designated size. For intermediate size rope, use next larger size socket. For example: When using 9/16˝ diameter wire rope use a 5/8˝sizeWedge Socket Assembly. Welding of the tail on standard wire rope is not recommended. The tail length of the dead end should be a minimum of 6 rope diameters but not less than 6.˝
• Align live end of rope, with center line of pin.
• Secure dead end section of rope.
• DO NOT ATTACH DEAD END TO LIVE END
• Use a hammer to seatWedge and Rope as deep into socket as possible before applying first load.
• To use with Rotation Resistant wire rope (special wire rope constructions with 8 or more outer strands) ensure that the dead end is welded, brazed or seized before inserting the wire rope into the wedge socket to prevent core slippage or loss of rope lay. The tail length of the dead end should be a minimum of 20 rope diameters but not less than 6˝.
Operating Safety
• Apply first load to fully seat theWedge and Wire Rope in the socket. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use.
• Efficiency rating of theWedge Socket termination is based upon the catalog breaking strength ofWire Rope. The efficiency of a properly assembledWedge Socket is 80%.
• During use, do not strike the dead end section with any other elements of the rigging (Called two-blocking).
WARNING
• Loads may slip or fall if theWedge Socket is not properly installed.
• A falling load can seriously injure or kill.
• Read and understand these instructions before installing the Wedge Socket.
• Do not side load theWedge Socket.
• Apply first load to fully seat theWedge andWire Rope in the socket. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use.

Important Safety Information —
Read and Follow
Inspection/Maintenance Safety
• Always inspect socket,wedge and pin before using.
• Do not use part showing cracks.
• Do not use modified or substitute parts.
• Repair minor nicks or gouges to socket or pin by lightly grinding until surfaces are smooth. Do not reduce original dimension more than 10%. Do not repair by welding.
• Inspect permanent assemblies annually, or more often in severe operating conditions.

Assembly Safety
• Use only with standard 6 to 8 strand wire rope of designated size. For intermediate size rope, use next larger size socket. For example: When using 9/16˝ diameter wire rope use a 5/8˝sizeWedge Socket Assembly. Welding of the tail on standard wire rope is not recommended. The tail length of the dead end should be a minimum of 6 rope diameters but not less than 6.˝
• To use with Rotation Resistant wire rope (special wire rope constructions with 8 or more outer strands) ensure that the dead end is welded, brazed or seized before inserting the wire rope into the wedge socket to prevent core slippage or loss of rope lay. The tail length of the dead end should be a minimum of 20 rope diameters, but not less than 6.˝
• Properly match socket,wedge and clip to wire rope size.
• Align live end of rope, with center line of pin.
• Secure dead end section of rope.
• Tighten nuts on clip to recommended torque.
• Do not attach dead end to live end or install wedge backwards.
• Use a hammer to seat Wedge and Rope as deep into socket as possible before applying first load.

Operating Safety
• Apply first load to fully seat theWedge and Wire Rope in the socket. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use.
• Efficiency rating of theWedge Socket termination is based upon the catalog breaking strength ofWire Rope. The efficiency of a properly assembledWedge Socket is 80%.
• During use, do not strike the dead end section with any other elements of the rigging (Called two-blocking).

WEDGE SOCKETS
The Crosby Group, Inc.
THE TERMINATOR™
• Basket is cast steel.
• Individually magnetic particle inspected.
• Pin diameter and jaw opening allows wedge and socket to be used in conjunction with open swage and spelter sockets.
• Secures the tail or “dead end” of the wire rope to the wedge, thus eliminates loss or “Punch out” of the wedge.
• Eliminates the need for an extra piece of rope, and is0 easily installed.
• The TERMINATOR™ wedge eliminates the potential breaking off of the tail due to fatigue.
• The tail, which is secured by the base of the clip and the wedge, is left undeformed and available for reuse.
• Incorporates Crosby’s patented QUIC-CHECK™ “Go” and “No-Go” feature cast into the wedge.The proper size rope is determined when the following criteria are met:
1. The wire rope should pass through the “Go” hole in the wedge.
2. The wire rope should NOT pass through the “No- Go” hole in the wedge.
• Utilizes standard Crosby Red-U-Bolt® wire rope clip.
• Generates a minimum efficiency of 80% based on the catalog breaking strength of wire rope.
• Standard S-421 wedge sockets can be retrofitted with the new style TERMINATOR™ wedge.
• Available with Bolt, Nut, and Cotter Pin.
WARNING
• Loads may slip or fall if theWedge Socket is not properly installed.
• A falling load can seriously injure or kill.
• Read and understand these instructions before installing theWedge Socket.
• Do not side load theWedge Socket.
• Apply first load to fully seat theWedge andWire Rope in the socket. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use.

ZINC-POURED SPELTER SOCKETING
1. Measure the Rope Ends to be Socketed
The rope end should be of sufficient length so that the ends of the unlaid wires (from the strands) will be at the top of the socket basket.
2. Apply Serving at Base of Socket
Apply a tight wire serving band, at the point where the socket base will be, for a length of two rope diameters.
3. Broom Out Strand Wires
Unlay and Straighten the individual rope strands and spread them evenly so that they form an included angle of approximately 60 degrees. Unlay the wires of each individual strand for the full length of the rope end— being careful not to disturb or change the lay of the wires and strands under the serving band. Unlay the wires of the independent wire rope core (IWRC) in the same manner. A fiber core should be cut out and removed as close to the serving band as possible.
4. Clean the Broomed-Out Ends
A suggested cleaning solvent for this step is SC-5 Methyl Chloroform or equivalent solvent. These are known under the names Chlorothane VG, 1-1-1 Trichlorethane, Perchloroethane, and Perchloroethylene.
CAUTION: Breathing the vapor of this solvent is harmful; it should only be used in a well-ventilated area. Be sure to follow the solvent manufacturer’s instructions, and carefully observe all instructions printed on the label.
Swish the broomed-out rope end in the solvent, then brush vigorously to remove all grease and dirt—making certain that the wires are clean to the very bottom of the broom up the serving band (Fig. 11). Additionally, a solution of muriatic acid may also be used. If acid is used, the broomed-out ends should be rinsed in a solution of bicarbonate of soda so as to neutralize any acid that may remain on the rope. Care should be exercised to prevent acid from entering the core; this is particularly important if the rope has a fiber core. Where it is feasible, the best and preferred cleaning method for rope ends prior to socketing is ultrasonic cleaning. After this cleaning step, place the broomed-out end pointing downward, allowing it to remain until all solvent has evaporated and the wires are dry.
Solvent should never be permitted to remain on the rope or on the serving band since it will run down the wires when the rope is turned upright.

SPELTER SOCKETS
General Guidelines

5. Dip the Broomed-Out Rope Ends in Flux Prepare a hot solution of zinc-ammonium chloride flux comparable to Zaclon K. Use a concentration of 1 lb. of zinc-ammonium chloride to 1 gallon of water; maintain the solution at a temperature of 180 degrees to 200 degrees F. Swish the broomed-out end in the flux solution, then point the rope end downward until such time as the wires have dried thoroughly.
6. Close Rope Ends and Place Socket
Use clean seizing wire to compress the broomed-end into a tight bundle which will permit the socket to be slipped easily over the wires (Fig. 13). Before placing the socket on the rope, make certain the socket is clean and no moisture is present inside the bowl of the socket. Heating the socket will dispel any residual moisture and will also prevent the zinc from freezing or cooling prematurely. A word of caution: Never heat a socket after it is placed on the rope. To do so may cause damage to the rope.
After the socket is on the rope, the wires should be distributed evenly in the socket basket so the zinc can surround each wire. Use extreme care in aligning the socket with the rope’s centerline, and in making certain there is a minimum vertical length of rope extending from the socket equal to about 30 rope diameters. This vertical length is necessary for rope balance. Premature wire breaks at the socket can occur if the rope is not balanced at pouring.
Seal the socket base with fire clay or putty but make certain the material does not penetrate into the socket base. Should this occur, it could prevent the zinc from penetrating the full length of the socket basket thereby creating a void that would collect moisture after the socket is placed in service.
7. Pour the Zinc
The zinc used should meet ASTM Specification designation B6-49 Grade (1) PrimeWestern or better, and Federal Specification QQ-Z-351-a Amendment 1, interim Amendment 2. Pour the zinc at a temperature of 950 degrees to 1000 degrees F (Fig. 15). A word of caution: Overheating of the zinc may affect its bonding properties. The zinc temperature may be measured with a portable pyrometer or a Tempilstik. Remove all dross from the top of the zinc pool before pouring. Pour the zinc in one continuous stream until it reaches the top of the basket and all wire ends are covered; there should be no “capping” of the socket.
8. Remove Serving
After the zinc and socket have cooled remove the serving band from the socket base and check to make certain that the zinc has penetrated to the socket base.
9. Lubricate the Rope
Apply wire rope lubricant to the rope at the base of the socket and on any rope section where the original lubricant may have been removed.

Thermo-Set Resin Socketing
Before proceeding with a thermo-set resin socketing procedure, check the resin manufacturer’s instructions carefully. Each resin system has specific procedures and steps which must be followed in the order specified for the system to give the desired results. Since any thermo-set resin system depends upon chemical reaction, the procedure becomes critically important.Give particular attention to selecting sockets designed for resin socketing. The following steps give a general outline to follow for resin socketing, they should not be used as a substitute for detailed instructions supplied by the resin manufacturer.
1. Measure the Rope Ends to be Socketed
The rope end should be of sufficient length so the ends of the unlaid wires (from the strands) will be at the top of the socket basket.
2. Apply Serving at Base of Socket
Apply a tight wire serving band, at the point where the socket base will be, for a length of two rope diameters.
3. Broom Out StrandWires
Unlay and straighten the individual rope strands and spread them evenly so that they form an included angle of approximately 60 degrees. Unlay the wires of each individual strand for the full length of the rope end— being careful not to disturb or change the lay of the wires and strands under the serving band. Unlay the wires of the independent wire rope core (IWRC) in the same manner. A fiber core should be cut out and removed as close to the serving band as possible.
4. Clean the Broomed-Out Ends
A suggested cleaning solvent for this step is SC-5 Methyl Chloroform or equivalent solvent. It is also known under the names Chlorothane VG, 1-1-1 Trichlorethane, Perchlorothane, and Perchloroethylene.
CAUTION: Breathing the vapor of this solvent is harmful it should only be used in a well-ventilated area. Be sure to follow the solvent manufacturer’s instructions, and carefully observe all instructions printed on the label. Swish the broomed-out rope end in the solvent, then brush vigorously to remove all grease and dirt—making certain that the wires are clean to the very bottom of the broom up to the serving band (Fig. 11). The use of acid to etch the wires before resin socketing is unnecessary and not recommended. Also, the use of flux on the wires before pouring resin should be avoided since this adversely affects resin bonding to the steel wires. Where it is feasible, the best and preferred cleaning method for rope ends prior to socketing is ultrasonic cleaning. After this cleaning step, place the broomed-out end pointing downward allowing it to remain until all solvent has evaporated and the wires are dry.
Solvent should never be permitted to remain on the rope or on the serving band since it will run down the wires when the rope is turned upright.
5. Close Rope Ends and Place Socket
Place rope in a vertical position with the broom end up. Close and compact the broom to permit insertion of the broomed end into the base of the socketing. Slip the socket on, removing any temporary banding or seizing as required.Make certain the broomed wires are uniformly spaced in the basket,with the wire ends slightly below the top edge of the basket, and the axis of the rope and the fitting are aligned. Seal the annular space between the base of the socket and the rope to prevent leakage of the resin from the basket. In addition to normal sealing materials, non-hardening butyl rubber-base sealant or latex glazing compounds are satisfactory for this purpose.Make sure the sealant does not enter the base of the socket so the resin will be able to fill the complete depth of the socket basket.
6. Pouring the Resin
Mix and pour the resin in strict accordance with the resin manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Lubrication After Socket Attachment
After the resin has cured, re-lubricate the wire rope at the base of the socket to replace any lubricant that may have been removed during the cleaning operation.

SPELTER SOCKETS
General Guidelines

8.Acceptable Resin Types
Properties of commerically available resins vary considerably. It is next to impossible to establish general rules to cover all available resins. It is extremely important to refer to the individual resin manufacturer’s instructions before using any one type. If the resin manufacturer has no data as to how his resin system preforms with wire rope socketing, tests should be conducted before the system is used for field applications.
When properly formulated, most thermoset resins are acceptable for socketing. These formulations, when mixed, form a pourable material which will harden at ambient temperature, or upon the application of moderate heat. No open flame or molten metal hazards exist with resin socketing since heat-curing when necessary, requires a relatively low temperature (250-300 degrees F) obtainable by electric resistance heating. Since resin socketing is so much simpler than zinc socketing, care must be taken not to become lax in following the recommended procedures.
Tests have demonstrated that satisfactory wire rope socketing performance can be obtained with resins having characteristics and properties as follows:
The resin shall be a liquid thermoset material that will harden after being mixed with the correct proportion of catalyst or curing agent. (Hardener)
A. Properties of Liquid (Uncured) Material
Resin and catalyst are normally supplied in two separate containers. After thoroughly mixing the two components together, the liquid can be poured into the socket basket. For ease of handling, liquid resins and catalysts should have the following properties:
1) Viscosity of the resin-catalyst mixture should be 30- 40,000 CPS at 75 degrees F immediately after mixing. The viscosity will increase at lower ambient temperature and the resin may require warming prior to mixing with the catalyst if ambient temperatures are too low.
2) Flash Point
Both resin and catalyst should have a minimum flash point of 100 degrees F.
3) Shelf Life
Unmixed resin and catalyst should have a maximum shelf life specified by the resin manufacturer.
4) Pot Life and Cure Time
After mixing, the resin-catalyst blend should be pourable for approximately eight minutes and should harden within 30 minutes. Heating the blend in the socket should be permissible to obtain the cure.
B. Properties of the Cured Resin
1) Socket Performance
The resin shall exhibit sufficient bonding to the solvent- washed wires in a wire rope end socket to develop the breaking strength of all types, constructions and grades of wire rope.No slippage of individual wires is permissible when testing resin socketed rope assemblies in tension. After testing, however, some “seating” of the resin cone may be apparent and is acceptable. The resin/wire bond within the cone or basket must be capable of withstanding tensile-shock loading encountered in normal field usage.
2) Compressive Strength
The minimum allowable compressive strength for fully cured resin is 12000 psi.
3) Shrinkage
Maximum allowable shrinkage is 2%. To control shrinkage, an inert filler may be used in the resin provided that the viscosity requirements are met. This filler material should always be formulated into the resin system by the resin manufacturer, not field mixed by the user.
4) Hardness
The desired hardness of the cured resin system is in the range of Barcol 40-55.
C. Performance of Resin Socketed Assemblies
Resin socketed assemblies may be moved after the resin has hardened. If the resin manufacturer’s directions are followed, resin sockets should develop the breaking strength of the rope, and have the capability to withstand shock loading to a degree sufficient to break the rope,without the resin cone cracking or breaking.
One final note: resin technology is changing almost daily. Characteristics of these products vary significantly and each must be handled differently. The resin manufacturer should supply specific data as to fitness of their system for wire rope socketing.
RESIN FOR SPELTER SOCKETS
The Crosby Group, Inc.
Warnings and Application Instructions

Strand Wire Rope 4
* = 5D or 50d (d= Diameter of the largest wire) WHICHEVER IS GREATER.
The following simplified, step-by-step instructions should be used only as a guide for experienced users. For full information, consult our document WIRELOCK® TECHNICAL DATA MANUAL, WIRE ROPE USER MANUAL by AISI and WIRE ROPE MANUFACTURERS CATALOGS.
STEP 1 – SOCKET SELECTION
1. WIRELOCK® is recommended for use with Crosby 416 – 417 Spelter Sockets.
2. For use with sockets other than Crosby 416 – 417 consult the socket manufacturer or Crosby Engineering.
3. Sockets used with WIRELOCK® shall comply with Federal or International (CEN, ISO) Standards.
4. WIRELOCK®, as with all socketing media, depends upon the wedging action of the cone within the socket basket to develop full efficiency. A rough finish inside the socket may increase the load at which seating will occur. Seating is required to develop the wedging action.
STEP 2 – SEIZING
Seize the wire rope or strand as shown using soft annealed iron wire.
STEP 3 – BROOMING
1. Unlay the strands of the wire rope and IWRC as far as the seizing.
2. Cut out any fiber core.
3. Unlay the individual wires from each strand, including the IWRC, completely, down to the seizing.
4. Remove any plastic material from broomed area.
Strand Wire Rope
STEP 4 – CLEANING
1. The method of cleaning will depend on the lubricant and/ or coating on the wire.
2. The methods and materials used for cleaning should comply with the current EPA regulations.
3. Consult theWire Rope Technical Board, your Wire Rope supplier or theWire Rope Manufacturer for recommended materials and methods.
4 The currently recommended Trichlorethane does not comply with the “Clean Air Act of 1990, Section 611, Ozone Depletion Substances.”
WARNING
• Incorrect use of WIRELOCK® can result in an unsafe termination which may lead to serious injury, death, or property damage.
• Do not use WIRELOCK® with stainless steel rope in salt water environment applications.
• Use only soft annealed iron wire for seizing.
• Do not use any other wire (copper, brass, stainless, etc.) for seizing.
• Never use an assembly until the WIRELOCK® has gelled and cured.
• Remove any non-metallic coating from the broomed area.e
• Sockets with large grooves need to have those grooves filled before use with WIRELOCK®.
• Read, understand, and follow these instructions and those on product containers before using WIRELOCK®.
Wirelock®
RESIN FOR SPELTER SOCKETS
The Crosby Group, Inc.
Warnings and Application Instructions
Wirelock®

STEP 5 – POSITIONING OF SOCKET
1. Position socket over the broom until the wires are LEVEL with the top of the socket basket or to a minimum embedded length as shown.
2. Clamp rope and socket vertically ensuring alignment of their axes.
3. CAUTION: DO NOT USE OVERSIZED SOCKETS FOR WIRE ROPE.
Wire Rope Strand
* = 5D or 50d (d = Diameter of the largest wire)
WHICHEVER IS GREATER.
STEP 6 – SEAL SOCKET
Seal the base of the socket with putty or plasticine to prevent leakage of the WIRELOCK®.
STEP 7 – WIRELOCK® KITS
1. WIRELOCK® kits are pre-measured and consist of two (2) containers – one (1) with resin and one (1) with granular compound.
2. Use the complete kit – NEVER MIX LESS THAN THE TOTAL CONTENTS OF BOTH CONTAINERS.
3. Each kit has a shelf life clearly marked on each container and this must be observed. NEVER USE OUT OF DATE KITS.
STEP 8 – MIXING AND POURING
1. Mix and pour WIRELOCK® within the temperature range of 48 degrees to 110 degrees F. Booster kits are available for reduced temperatures.
2. Pour all the resin into a container containing all the granular compound and mix thoroughly for two (2) minutes with a flat paddle.
3. Immediately after mixing, slowly pour the mixture down one side of the socket until the socket basket is full.
STEP 9 – CURING
1. WIRELOCK® will gel in approximately 15 minutes, in a temperature range 65 degrees F. to 75 degrees F.
2. The socket must remain in the vertical position for an additional ten (10) minutes after gel is complete.
3 The socket will be ready for service 60 minutes after gelling.
4. Never heat sockets to accelerate gel or curing.
STEP 10 – RE-LUBRICATION
Re-lubricate wire rope as required.
STEP 11 – PROOF LOADING
Whenever possible, the assembly should be proof loaded. All slings with poured sockets, in accordance with ASME B30.9, shall be Proof Loaded.
CAUTION
• WIRELOCK® resin, in liquid state, is flammable.
• Chemicals used in this product can give off toxic fumes and can burn eyes and skin.
• Never use out-of-date material.
• Use only in well-ventilated work areas.
• Never breathe fumes directly or for extended time.
• Always wear safety glasses to protect eyes.
• Always wear gloves to protect hands.
• Avoid direct contact with skin anywhere.

RESIN FOR SPELTER SOCKETS
The Crosby Group, Inc.

• 100% termination efficiency.
• Temperature operating range is -65° F to +240° F.
• Ideal for on site applications.
• No hazardous molten metal.
• Improved fatigue life.
• Pouring temperature without booster pack is 48° F to 110° F.
• One booster pack if pouring temperature is 35° F to 48° F.
• Two booster packs if pouring temperature is 27° F to 35° F.
• Refer toWirelock® Technical Manual for more information.
SWAGE SOCKETS
The Crosby Group, Inc.
S-501 Open Swage Socket

Swage sockets incorporate a reduced machined area of the shank which is equivalent to the proper after Swage dimension. Before swaging, this provides for an obvious visual difference in the shank diameter. After swaging, a uniform shank diameter is created allowing for a QUIC CHECK™ and permanent visual inspection opportunity. Designed to quickly determine whether the socket has been through the swaging operation and assist in field inspections, it does not eliminate the need to perform standard production inspections which include gauging for the proper after swage dimensions or proof loading. U.S. Patent 5,152,630 and foreign equivalents.
• Forged from special bar quality carbon steel, suitable for cold forming.
• Hardness controlled by spheroidize annealing.
• Swage Socket terminations have an efficiency rating of 100% based on the catalog strength of wire rope.
• Stamp for identification after swaging without concern for fractures (as per directions in National Swaging Brochure).

Swage sockets incorporate a reduced machined area of the shank which is equivalent to the proper after Swage dimension. Before swaging, this provides for an obvious visual difference in the shank diameter. After swaging, a uniform shank diameter is created allowing for a QUIC CHECK™ and permanent visual inspection opportunity. Designed to quickly determine whether the socket has been through the swaging operation and assist in field inspections, it does not eliminate the need to perform standard production inspections which include gauging for the proper after swage dimensions or proof loading.
• Forged from special bar quality carbon steel, suitable for cold forming.
• Hardness controlled by spheroidize annealing.
• Swage Socket terminations have an efficiency rating of 100% based on the catalog strength of wire rope.
• Stamp for identification after swaging without concern for fractures (as per directions in National Swaging Brochure).

TYPICAL ASSEMBLY Electroline fittings are the first real advance in connecting practices since the development of wire rope.These fittings are remarkably compact assemblies of three basic units:
1. The sleeve, which slips over the end of the rope.
2. The plug, (see inset photo) which is inserted to separate and hold the rope strands in the sleeve.
3. The covering socket.
The combination of these three units literally locks the rope into a strong, solid assembly. Strand passed through sleeve.
SLEEVE
Wire rope passed through sleeve and strands fanned out for inspection of fluted plug.
SLEEVE PLUG
Plug driven in and strands closed to apply socket.
SLEEVE PLUG SOCKET
Socket applied showing twisted strands and completed assembly.
CUTAWAY ASSEMBLY
Working loads
Electroline terminations, when properly assembled, will hold the “normal” or “rated” breaking strength of the IPS wire rope. They are certified by the “Underwriters Laboratory, Inc.” (Safety Appliance No. 799) to hold no less than 85% of the rated breaking strength of the rope. Fittings are designed for linear loads only.
Electroline terminations are NOT marked with a safe working load (SWL) as the termination is a component of an assembly which includes the wire rope. Due to the many different types of ropes with which our termination may be used, the safe working load is dependent upon the type of rope and the usage.
Electroline terminations are designed to have a breaking strength greater than 6×19 IPS IWRC wire rope of the corresponding size. Our safety factor is 1.3 for the machined fittings and 2.0 for the forged types. However, the rope is the weakest component of the assembly, and these safety factors cannot be used to determine the SWL of the assembly.